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David Chang’s Favorite Snack: Tingly Popcorn

This is hands down the best popcorn. You could use any of the seasoned salts for popcorn, but my favorite is tingly. You get that tingly, numbing sensation from the Sichuan peppercorns plus the rounded umami flavors of our salt. It’s not necessary, but’s great if you toss in a little sugar too.

1 cup yellow popcorn kernels
½ cup neutral oil, such as safflower oil 
Momofuku Tingly Seasoned Salt (or another seasoned salt of your choice)
Sugar (optional)

Combine popcorn kernels and ¼ cup neutral oil in a large pop over high heat. Cover and wait for it to start popping. As it pops, gently shake pot to stir around the kernels. It is finished popping when there are about 3 seconds between pops. Uncover and pour in additional ¼ cup oil and top with several pinches of Momofuku Tingly Seasoned Salt (3 to 4 tablespoons or more) plus a dash of sugar, if desired. Toss to combine. Continue seasoning until it reaches the level of saltiness you desire.

Pantry Starter Pack | Bring Momofuku flavor to your home kitchen with our pantry starter pack. Featuring our Savory, Tingly and Spicy Seasoned Salts, Soy Sauce, Tamari, and Chili Crunch, this pack will give you the tools to season, sauce, and spice up your favorite dishes.

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David Chang’s Savory Baked Chicken & Crispy Rice with Breakfast Sausage

I wanted to show the versatility of Savory. This dish is a homage to a lot of different rice dishes. It starts with breakfast sausage, chicken, tomatoes, and mushrooms—just whatever you have in your refrigerator—plus thyme, a little sumac, a little chicken stock, and our Savory Seasoned Salt. 

It’s really balanced. It’s got sweetness. It’s got a little bit of bitterness from the burnt rice on top. You have the salty. You have the umami. You have a little bit of acidity. The more I cook, the more I want to explore, to do different things and dishes that are easier, but are complex in flavor.

½–1 lb package of breakfast sausage, casings removed
2 lbs bone-chicken (skin-on thighs or breasts, or mix of legs and thighs)
4 cloves of garlic, minced
A few sprigs of thyme
1 medium yellow onion, sliced
2 small tomatoes, quartered
3 scallions (white and green parts), roughly chopped
1½ cups Jasmine rice
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
½ cup white wine (optional)
2 cups chicken broth
½ cup mushrooms, sliced
Sumac, for serving (optional)
Momofuku Savory Seasoned Salt

Heat oven to 400°F. Season chicken on both sides with savory seasoned salt (about 2 tablespoons). 

Heat a large skillet or braiser over medium high heat and add breakfast sausage, breaking up with the back of a spoon. Cook for about 4 minutes until browned on one side and fat is beginning to render in the pan. Then, add in seasoned chicken. Continue cooking 6–8 minutes until sausage is cooked and chicken is browned slightly on both sides. Add garlic and cook 1 minute until fragrant. Add thyme, onions, tomatoes, scallions, and butter and cook for 2–3 minutes, allowing flavors to meld. Top with rice. Optional: deglaze skillet with wine and cook for 1 minute until completely dissolved. 

Add chicken broth to skillet, then top with sliced mushrooms and bring to a boil. Transfer to the oven. Roast until chicken is cooked through (165°F) and rice is tender, about 40 minutes. If rice looks dry, add additional broth or water. Once cooked through, turn your broiler to high and place the skillet right under the broiler for about 2 minutes to crisp up rice. Finish with 1 teaspoon of Savory Seasoned Salt and 2 teaspoons of Sumac. 

Pantry Starter Pack | Bring Momofuku flavor to your home kitchen with our pantry starter pack. Featuring our Savory, Tingly and Spicy Seasoned Salts, Soy Sauce, Tamari, and Chili Crunch, this pack will give you the tools to season, sauce, and spice up your favorite dishes.

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David Chang’s Trick for the Best Steamed Vegetables

If you’re cooking vegetables at home, these salts are the easiest way to add flavor.

We eat a lot of broccoli in our house, especially because my son likes to eat it so we have a lot on hand. We just steam it, and we add Tingly or Spicy—or even Savory and some lemon juice. You could do asparagus or cabbage or really any other vegetable you like, depending on what you have and what you want. These Seasoned Salts are an easy way to add flavor to whatever you are making.

Here are some approximations, but feel free to adjust based on what you have and what you like best. Be sure to tag us on Instagram with whatever vegetables you’re seasoning with our Seasoned Salts.

1–1½ pounds of broccoli, cabbage, asparagus—or other vegetable of your choice
3 tablespoons butter
1 tablespoon Momofuku Seasoned Salt
½ tablespoon lemon juice (if using Savory Seasoned Salt)

Steam, boil, or microwave your vegetables until desired tenderness. (It’s about 3–4 minutes for broccoli.) Meanwhile, melt your butter on the stove or microwave and add your seasoned salt of choice. If using Savory Seasoned Salt, add in lemon juice.

Drain vegetables and drizzle with seasoned butter. Serve by finishing with more Seasoned Salt to taste.

Pantry Starter Pack | Bring Momofuku flavor to your home kitchen with our pantry starter pack. Featuring our Savory, Tingly and Spicy Seasoned Salts, Soy Sauce, Tamari, and Chili Crunch, this pack will give you the tools to season, sauce, and spice up your favorite dishes.

Buy Now | Save 10% + Get Free Shipping

David Chang’s 10-Minute Tingly Microwave Chicken

I think this recipe will be my greatest legacy because it’s sandbaggery at the highest level. It’s hacking dinner. It’s really two very simple dishes. I sauté whatever vegetables I have on hand—you could do bok choy, cabbage, broccoli, or asparagus—and mushrooms, then I add chicken that I’ve microwaved. And I use our tingly seasoned salt.

Before tingly, I never used Sichuan peppercorns at home because I couldn’t find them in the grocery store, and I always forget to take them from the restaurants. Just opening up the jar of tingly, I can smell the Sichuan peppercorns, and it’s got a little bit of heat. It’s almost like Sour Patch Kids for adults, right? It’s not tart, but it has, again, the numbing, tingly sensation.

I dare you to find something that’s more delicious in 10 minutes with this kind of dish.

1½–2 pounds boneless chicken thighs (fresh or frozen)
2 tablespoons neutral oil
2 cloves garlic, chopped
1-in knob ginger, roughly chopped
3–4 cups chopped vegetables, such as Napa Cabbage, Bok Choy, Broccoli, or Asparagus
1 cup mushrooms, sliced
1 bunch green onions, greens and whites roughly chopped
½ teaspoon sesame oil
Momofuku Tingly Seasoned Salt

Empty chicken thighs directly from the package into a microwave-safe bowl and microwave on high for 8 minutes. If frozen, microwave 10–12 minutes and check for doneness. Chicken will be mostly cooked but slightly pink in the middle.

When chicken has about 3 minutes left in the microwave, begin vegetable sauté. Heat oil in a large skillet over medium high heat until hot. Add garlic and ginger and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add chopped vegetables, mushrooms, onions, and 2 tablespoons of Momofuku Tingly Seasoned Salt, tossing to combine while your chicken finishes in the microwave.

Remove chicken from the microwave and use kitchen shears to cut up the chicken right in the bowl. Add chicken and juices from the bowl to your skillet and continue tossing until chicken is completely cooked. Add another tablespoon (or to taste) of Momofuku Tingly Seasoned Salt and ½ teaspoon of sesame oil.

Serve with rice or egg noodles.


 

Momofuku Seasoned Salt is a starter pack of flavor to take your cooking to the next level, packed with the same umami-rich ingredients we use in our Momofuku restaurant kitchens. 

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Dave’s Extremely Easy Spicy Shrimp

This is the perfect amount of spice level for me. While I want it spicy, I still want to be able to taste everything else, and the thing I like about our spicy salt is that there’s a roundness to it. It’s not just an umami blast and a spice blast. We put ingredients in there that really do round it all out.

I just peeled some fresh shrimp—and kept the head on. But you can do this just as easily with frozen shrimp, like frozen wild rock shrimp.

If we had a grill I would season these ahead of time and just grill them shell-on. That would be delicious. I could also turn this into fried rice or add rice cakes. There are a lot of different directions to take this dish.

Ingredients
2 tbsp Extra virgin olive oil
1–2 lb Shrimp, head-on and peeled (or frozen)
1 medium Onion, thinly sliced
2–3 cloves Garlic, thinly sliced
2 tbsp Butter
Freshly squeezed lemon juice from ½ lemon
Momofuku Spicy Seasoned Salt
Rice cakes, cooked according to package instructions (optional)

Toss shrimp, oil, and 2 tablespoons of spicy seasoned salt in a bowl and marinate for 10-15 minutes and up to 3 hours. Heat pan over medium heat until it’s hot. Add shrimp to pan.

Flip when one side becomes pink (1–2 minutes), then add the sliced onion and garlic. Cook another minute, then deglaze with lemon juice and butter. If you are adding rice cakes, add them now. Add 1 additional tablespoon of spicy seasoned salt to taste.

Serve with lemon wedges and spicy seasoned salt for finishing.


 

Momofuku Seasoned Salt is a starter pack of flavor to take your cooking to the next level, packed with the same umami-rich ingredients we use in our Momofuku restaurant kitchens. 

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Dave’s Korean One-pot Stew

One of my favorite things to make is any kind of soup or stew. I grew up eating Galbi-tang, which is a short rib soup. You can use any kind of beef you want. I’ve made it with chuck before, which is delicious—but I use short ribs most often. You could soak them in water beforehand, but I’m not. Being a new dad, I try to make food as fast as possible. So this is what I called a raging hard boil Galbi-tang soup because, again, I’m trying to make this as fast as humanly possible. 

I’m not the biggest fan of canned and boxed broths and stocks. I’d rather just use water. All we do here is add the short ribs, cover them in water, and add our savory seasoned salt. It’s almost like a hack bouillon cube. 

Savory is compatible with just about every flavor I find in the world—it’s like superglue. I made this as a Korean stew, but if I add thyme, potatoes, celery, carrots and cooked with some white wine instead, it becomes more French. Or, if I add some rosemary, a parmesan rind, and maybe some cannellini beans, it becomes more Italian. You don’t have to make this Korean stew I grew up eating—we created savory seasoned salt to go with all kinds of flavors.

3–4 pounds Short rib, bone-in, cut into 2-in long pieces
1 Daikon radish, halved and cut into thin slices
4 cloves Garlic, thinly sliced
1 bunch of Scallions, greens and whites, roughly chopped
1 medium Onion, halved and sliced
Pack of Glass Noodles, soaked according to package directions
1 cup Rice Cakes, either cylindrical or sliced
2½ tablespoons Mirin (optional)
Momofuku Savory Seasoned Salt

  1. Add short ribs to a heavy, lidded pot or donabe over high heat and cover with water. Season with 3 tablespoons of Momofuku Savory Seasoned Salt and bring to a boil. Cover and boil for 1½ hours. Check every half hour to be sure short ribs still completely submerged—if not, add more water.
  2. Add sliced daikon, garlic, and another 2 tablespoons of Momofuku Savory Seasoned Salt. Cover and continue until short ribs are very soft, about 30 minutes more. Again, check throughout to be sure everything remains submerged. 
  3. Check for the doneness of your short ribs—they should be cooked through and tender. Adjust seasoning of your stew, adding more savory seasoned salt as needed.
  4. Add chopped scallions, onions, glass noodles, rice cakes, and 2½ tablespoons of mirin (if using), and continue to boil until rice cakes are cooked through, about 5 minutes. 
  5. To serve, spoon stew into individual bowls and sprinkle with additional savory seasoned salt as needed.

 

Momofuku Seasoned Salt is a starter pack of flavor to take your cooking to the next level, packed with the same umami-rich ingredients we use in our Momofuku restaurant kitchens. 

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Spicy Fried Chicken

  • 1 cup soy sauce
  • 1 cup apple juice
  • 2 tablespoons Spicy Seasoned Salt + additional for finishing
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • ½ cup dark brown sugar
  • 1 cup rice flour
  • ½ cup all purpose flour + additional for dredging
  • ½ cup tapioca starch
  • Neutral Oil, such as Canola, for frying

First, make the marinade. Mix the soy sauce, apple juice, 1 tablespoon Spicy Seasoned Salt, garlic, brown sugar, and 1 cup of water with a whisk until the sugar is dissolved. Lightly score the pieces of chicken, then marinate the chicken for about 2 hours in the refrigerator. 

Then, prepare the batter. Sift the rice flour, all purpose flour, and tapioca starch into a mixing bowl, then mix in 1 tablespoon of Spicy Seasoned Salt. Stir in 1 cup cold water. Remove chicken from marinade and pat dry with paper towels. Lightly coat chicken with all purpose flour, then dip in the batter allowing excess to drip off.

Cook it in a deep-fryer at 325°F between 4–5 minutes until the chicken reaches 165°F internal temperature.Allow fried chicken to drip onto a paper towel or a wire rack. Finish with Spicy Seasoned Salt and serve with your favorite bread and butter pickles.

 


Momofuku Seasoned Salt is a starter pack of flavor to take your cooking to the next level, packed with the same umami-rich ingredients we use in our Momofuku restaurant kitchens. 

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Savory Garlic Noodles

  • ¼ lb bucatini
  • 2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
  • ¼ teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • ½ cup water
  • 1 teaspoon Momofuku Savory Seasoned Salt*
  • 2 tablespoons Italian parsley, roughly chopped

*Savory spice can be replaced with Momofuku Tingly Seasoned Salt. Reduce to 1½ teaspoons of Savory Seasoned Salt.

Cook pasta according to package directions for 1 minute less than instructed. It should taste more al dente than you typically enjoy. 

Add olive oil to a sauté pan over medium heat with sliced garlic and red pepper flakes. Cook on low heat until the garlic turns light golden.

Set aside ½ cup of the pasta water. Transfer the cooked pasta into the sauté pan, and add the ½ cup of water. Add in Momofuku Tingly Seasoned Salt and cook the pasta on low while tossing it in the infused olive oil. Cook to your desired doneness—approximately 1 to 2 minutes.

Finish with a handful of chopped parsley and more Tingly Seasoned Salt, to taste.


Momofuku Seasoned Salt is a starter pack of flavor to take your cooking to the next level, packed with the same umami-rich ingredients we use in our Momofuku restaurant kitchens. 

Buy Now

Tingly Honey Glazed Eggplant

  • 2 Italian eggplants
  • ½ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 4 tablespoons honey
  • 4 cloves garlic, thickly sliced
  • 1 lemon, quartered
  • 4 teaspoons Momofuku Tingly Seasoned Salt, plus more to taste

Preheat oven to 350°.

Slice eggplants in half lengthwise and score the inside flesh into approximately 1 inch squares, about ½ inch deep. Be careful not to slice through the skin of the eggplant.

Mix olive oil, honey, and 4 teaspoons Momofuku Tingly Seasoned Salt until well-combined. Brush the mixture over the entire flesh of the eggplant, allowing it to seep into the grooves. Reserve a few tablespoons of glaze for later. Place sliced garlic into the grooves of the scored eggplant.

Roast eggplant on a parchment-lined baking sheet for 35 to 45 minutes, adjusting for desired doneness—slightly less time for just-cooked eggplant and slightly longer for more tender eggplant. Remove from oven and brush with remaining glaze. Sprinkle with Momofuku Tingly Seasoned Salt to taste.

Serve immediately with fresh lemon wedges.


Momofuku Seasoned Salts are a starter pack of flavor to take your cooking to the next level, packed with the same umami-rich ingredients we use in our Momofuku restaurant kitchens. 

Buy Now

Boil Your Chicken Instead of Roasting It

We’re still a few months from peak chicken-roasting season. Before the copper pots come out, before the cooking twine is cut, before best-laid plans are made for golden-brown birds, we’re taking a stand against roasted chicken. Boil it instead.

The team at Majordōmo has been boiling their chicken since the very beginning. You don’t lose the precious juice that seeps away with roasted chicken. It all goes into the soup.

Boiled Chicken

Their recipe is based on sujebi, a Korean hand-torn noodle soup that Dave Chang’s mom used to make for him as a kid. She’d throw whole chickens into piping hot water and boil them, then use the noodles to thicken the broth. Sujebi dates back to around the year 1000, but it became popular again during the Korean War, when rice was so expensive.

Sujebi is not dissimilar from Southern chicken and dumplings, another dish that grew out of hard times. A creamy chicken soup is cooked with strips of pastry or biscuit dumplings. During the Great Depression, chicken and dumplings was a go-to for families trying to stretch scraps into a meal. It’s also one of Dave’s favorite dishes from growing up in Virginia.

At Majordōmo, the Whole Boiled Chicken comes in two courses. First, the team carves the boiled  breasts and serves them over chicken rice, a nod to Hainanese chicken. The chicken and rice are topped with a green ginger scallion sauce and a red black bean sauce, inspired by Gabriela Cámara’s painted whole fish at Contramar in Mexico City.

Then, the dark meat is cooked into the soup with hand-torn noodles and whatever is fresh at the farmers markets around town.

The soup is featured in this season of Buzzfeed’s Worth It alongside two other Korean soups in Los Angeles, from Spoon by H and Hanbat Shul-lung-tang. Watch the episode and visit Majordōmo to try  the Whole Boiled Chicken.


The One Pot You Need for this Boil

For chicken in a pot, you need a big cast iron. We love this one from Le Creuset—it’s the perfect size for a whole chicken, and if you’re going to commit to buying a cast iron, this is one of the best on the market.

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